Economist GMAT Reading Comprehension Challenge #36

Economist GMAT Reading Comprehension Challenge #36

Read Economist articles to boost your GMAT Reading Comprehension skills! Need some help making the most of these? Here are tips for reading the Economist articles.

Economist Article

Economist Article: Reviled to Revered: China has given up trying to eradicate wolves

Link: https://www.economist.com/china/2021/02/27/china-has-given-up-trying-to-eradicate-wolves

Paragraph Summaries

Conservationists had much to cheer about…

This February, China unexpectedly reversed course on a 70+ year history of treating wolves as pests when the common wolf was added to the country’s list of protected animals.

In Chinese, as in other languages…

Aspects of Chinese language and culture (as is the case in other countries) give the wolf a negative connotation of collusion and cruelty.

A bestseller released in 2004…

A 2004 Chinese bestseller called Wolf Totem, which associated the wolf with vigor and strong will, began to change the connotation associated with wolves as the book became popular with national officials.

Such lupine imagery remains in vogue…

Today, the imagery associated with wolves in China is still the positive one made popular by Wolf Totem, now with various uses in patriotic imagery.

Wolf Totem gave rise to many new stories…

The book’s impact has also spilled over to other elements of pop culture, and the legal protection recently given to wolves is likely the result of this change in the cultural consciousness in addition to the conservationists who pushed for their inclusion on list.

Primary Purpose

To discuss the means by which a cultural shift occurred and laid the groundwork for a corresponding shift in policy.

Main Idea

A change in the national attitude and imagery associated with wolves was a major factor in their gaining legal protection status in China.

Happy Studies

Hope you found this Economist GMAT RC Challenge interesting and helpful. Good luck on your GMAT verbal – keep reading!

Which of the following fractions is closest to ?

A. 4/7

B. 5/9

C. 6/11

D. 7/13

E. 9/16

Correct Answer: D

Full explanation coming soon. Send us a note if you’d like this added to the express queue!

You’ll find tons of practice questions, explanations for GMAT Official Guide questions, and strategies on our GMAT Question of the Day page.

Here are a few other extra challenging GMAT questions with in depth explanations:

Here’s a tough function question from the GMAT Prep tests 1 and 2:

For which of the following functions is f(a+b) = f(b) + f(a) for all positive numbers a and b?

And a very challenging word problem from the Official Guide. Almost no-one gets this one on the first try but there is a somewhat simple way through it:

Last Sunday a certain store sold copies of Newspaper A for $1.00 each and copies of Newspaper B for $1.25 each, and the store sold no other newspapers that day. If r percent of the store’s revenues from newspaper sales was from Newspaper A and if p percent of the newspapers that the store sold were copies of newspaper A, which of the following expresses r in terms of p?

Tanya’s letters from the GMAT Prep tests. This one often gets GMAT tutoring students caught up in a tangled net. With combinatorics it’s important to stay practical. We’ll take a look at how to do that in the explanation:

Tanya prepared 4 different letters to be sent to 4 different addresses. For each letter, she prepared an envelope with its correct address. If the 4 letters are to be put into the 4 envelopes at random, what is the probability that only 1 letter will be put into the envelope with its correct address?

Here’s an exponents puzzle that comes up a lot in GMAT tutoring sessions:

If n is a positive integer and n^2 is divisible by 72, then the largest positive integer that must divide n is

This is one of the most difficult questions in the GMAT universe. That said, there is a simple way to solve it that relies on a fundamental divisibility rule every GMAT studier should know:

For every positive even integer n, the function h(n) is defined to be the product of all the even integers from 2 to n, inclusive. If p is the smallest prime factor of h(100) +1, then p is?

Learn more about GMAT tutoring with Atlantic

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  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

The quotient when a certain number is divided by  is . What is the number?

A. 4/27

B. 1/3

C. 3

D. 6

E. 27/4

Correct Answer: C

Full explanation coming soon. Send us a note if you’d like this added to the express queue!

You’ll find tons of practice questions, explanations for GMAT Official Guide questions, and strategies on our GMAT Question of the Day page.

Here are a few other extra challenging GMAT questions with in depth explanations:

Here’s a tough function question from the GMAT Prep tests 1 and 2:

For which of the following functions is f(a+b) = f(b) + f(a) for all positive numbers a and b?

And a very challenging word problem from the Official Guide. Almost no-one gets this one on the first try but there is a somewhat simple way through it:

Last Sunday a certain store sold copies of Newspaper A for $1.00 each and copies of Newspaper B for $1.25 each, and the store sold no other newspapers that day. If r percent of the store’s revenues from newspaper sales was from Newspaper A and if p percent of the newspapers that the store sold were copies of newspaper A, which of the following expresses r in terms of p?

Tanya’s letters from the GMAT Prep tests. This one often gets GMAT tutoring students caught up in a tangled net. With combinatorics it’s important to stay practical. We’ll take a look at how to do that in the explanation:

Tanya prepared 4 different letters to be sent to 4 different addresses. For each letter, she prepared an envelope with its correct address. If the 4 letters are to be put into the 4 envelopes at random, what is the probability that only 1 letter will be put into the envelope with its correct address?

Here’s an exponents puzzle that comes up a lot in GMAT tutoring sessions:

If n is a positive integer and n^2 is divisible by 72, then the largest positive integer that must divide n is

This is one of the most difficult questions in the GMAT universe. That said, there is a simple way to solve it that relies on a fundamental divisibility rule every GMAT studier should know:

For every positive even integer n, the function h(n) is defined to be the product of all the even integers from 2 to n, inclusive. If p is the smallest prime factor of h(100) +1, then p is?

Learn more about GMAT tutoring with Atlantic

GMAT Tutoring Consultation

 

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  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Shawana made a schedule for reading books during 4 weeks (28 days) of her summer vacation. She has checked out 12 books from the library. The number of pages in each book and the order in which she plans to read the books are shown in the table above. She will read exactly 50 pages each day. The only exception will be that she will never begin the next book on the same day that she finishes the previous one, and therefore on some days she may read fewer than 50 pages. At the end of the 28th day, how many books will Shawana have finished?

A. 7

B. 8

C. 9

D. 10

E. 11

Correct Answer: B

Full explanation coming soon. Send us a note if you’d like this added to the express queue!

You’ll find tons of practice questions, explanations for GMAT Official Guide questions, and strategies on our GMAT Question of the Day page.

Here are a few other extra challenging GMAT questions with in depth explanations:

Here’s a tough function question from the GMAT Prep tests 1 and 2:

For which of the following functions is f(a+b) = f(b) + f(a) for all positive numbers a and b?

And a very challenging word problem from the Official Guide. Almost no-one gets this one on the first try but there is a somewhat simple way through it:

Last Sunday a certain store sold copies of Newspaper A for $1.00 each and copies of Newspaper B for $1.25 each, and the store sold no other newspapers that day. If r percent of the store’s revenues from newspaper sales was from Newspaper A and if p percent of the newspapers that the store sold were copies of newspaper A, which of the following expresses r in terms of p?

Tanya’s letters from the GMAT Prep tests. This one often gets GMAT tutoring students caught up in a tangled net. With combinatorics it’s important to stay practical. We’ll take a look at how to do that in the explanation:

Tanya prepared 4 different letters to be sent to 4 different addresses. For each letter, she prepared an envelope with its correct address. If the 4 letters are to be put into the 4 envelopes at random, what is the probability that only 1 letter will be put into the envelope with its correct address?

Here’s an exponents puzzle that comes up a lot in GMAT tutoring sessions:

If n is a positive integer and n^2 is divisible by 72, then the largest positive integer that must divide n is

This is one of the most difficult questions in the GMAT universe. That said, there is a simple way to solve it that relies on a fundamental divisibility rule every GMAT studier should know:

For every positive even integer n, the function h(n) is defined to be the product of all the even integers from 2 to n, inclusive. If p is the smallest prime factor of h(100) +1, then p is?

Learn more about GMAT tutoring with Atlantic

GMAT Tutoring Consultation

 

GMAT Question of the Day Signup

Sign up for 1 challenging GMAT question sent to you each week.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

The price of gasoline at a service station increased from $1.65 per gallon last week to $1.82 per gallon this week. Sally paid $26.40 for gasoline last week at the station. How much more will Sally pay this week at the station for the same amount of gasoline?

A. $ 1.70

B. $2.55

C. $2.64

D. $2.72

E. $2.90

Correct Answer: D

Full explanation coming soon. Send us a note if you’d like this added to the express queue!

You’ll find tons of practice questions, explanations for GMAT Official Guide questions, and strategies on our GMAT Question of the Day page.

Here are a few other extra challenging GMAT questions with in depth explanations:

Here’s a tough function question from the GMAT Prep tests 1 and 2:

For which of the following functions is f(a+b) = f(b) + f(a) for all positive numbers a and b?

And a very challenging word problem from the Official Guide. Almost no-one gets this one on the first try but there is a somewhat simple way through it:

Last Sunday a certain store sold copies of Newspaper A for $1.00 each and copies of Newspaper B for $1.25 each, and the store sold no other newspapers that day. If r percent of the store’s revenues from newspaper sales was from Newspaper A and if p percent of the newspapers that the store sold were copies of newspaper A, which of the following expresses r in terms of p?

Tanya’s letters from the GMAT Prep tests. This one often gets GMAT tutoring students caught up in a tangled net. With combinatorics it’s important to stay practical. We’ll take a look at how to do that in the explanation:

Tanya prepared 4 different letters to be sent to 4 different addresses. For each letter, she prepared an envelope with its correct address. If the 4 letters are to be put into the 4 envelopes at random, what is the probability that only 1 letter will be put into the envelope with its correct address?

Here’s an exponents puzzle that comes up a lot in GMAT tutoring sessions:

If n is a positive integer and n^2 is divisible by 72, then the largest positive integer that must divide n is

This is one of the most difficult questions in the GMAT universe. That said, there is a simple way to solve it that relies on a fundamental divisibility rule every GMAT studier should know:

For every positive even integer n, the function h(n) is defined to be the product of all the even integers from 2 to n, inclusive. If p is the smallest prime factor of h(100) +1, then p is?

Learn more about GMAT tutoring with Atlantic

GMAT Tutoring Consultation

 

GMAT Question of the Day Signup

Sign up for 1 challenging GMAT question sent to you each week.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

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